Link: http://we-are-awesome.com/split-by-aidan-tobias-interview-nsfw/

Aidan Tobias recently sent us some of his latest images from a recent piece published on Sticks and Stones . We had a few words with him about the shoot and his role as a photographer.

Thinking behind the shoot?

I was approached by Tayla Boswell about two months ago, asking me to shoot for her student project on branding. While she already had an idea of what she wanted, we sat down and brainstormed some ideas. We ended up aiming for a sort of sinful feeling, wanting to shock the audience by doing something a bit explicit.

Later I had the idea of sending the images to Sticks and Stones, who I’ve always been a fan of, who liked what they saw and decided to feature the images.

You seem to have photographed women without many clothes on on several occasions. How do you rationalise this, as a man and a photographer?

I mostly shoot events, as well as candid shots of everyday life, portraits, and whatever else comes my way (I basically take my camera wherever I go, and meet a lot of people). That being said, looking at my different social media outlets, it seems that the images that are more revealing and a bit provocative do get the most traction. It’s crazy to see how amongst all my different images the ones that get the most attention are the ones of nude or semi-nude women.

The majority of the people I photograph are people I know or at least have met. I love shooting no matter what the subject matter is. I could photograph a dead pigeon on the road and find something interesting in it (I have actually done that).

I hardly ever approach people, it’s normally someone else contacting or commissioning me, or a model asking me to shoot them. I try keeping an open mind, and if I like the idea, and I have the time, I’ll shoot it. Looking at my recent work, it seems like shots of women are very prevalent – this was not planned. I guess, the word has just gone out about what kind of work I do and I’ve been getting commissions non-stop. It seems that it’s what people like, and want me to do.

Do you think you have a responsibility as an artist as to how you portray women?

Yes I do. The female figure is beautiful and something to document. People shouldn’t be ashamed of their bodies (even if they’re overweight or skinny). People have flaws and everyone has things they don’t like about themselves, but I think it’s nice when people drop that attitude and show who they are and what they look like – they don’t hide. There’s something noble and daring in that.
I also feel that woman generally are quite harsh on their own self-image and how they perceive themselves.

Ultimately, I want to capture things with an intriguing aesthetic and I find that in women. Maybe it sounds misogynistic and maybe I should be concerned with changing discourses around representation, objectification and the like. But I’m still going to continue taking images I think are beautiful.

Who’s your dream subject?

There are a hundred and one things I would love to shoot. I’ve always wanted to do underwater photography and wildlife, but have never had the opportunity or proper equipment and housings.